Report: 10 percent of lobsters in Britain are killed before being boiled

Be careful what you boil and eat. A British Parliament committee report released Thursday found that a maximum of 10 percent of lobsters and crabs are having their lives taken by the boiling pot….

Report: 10 percent of lobsters in Britain are killed before being boiled

Be careful what you boil and eat.

A British Parliament committee report released Thursday found that a maximum of 10 percent of lobsters and crabs are having their lives taken by the boiling pot.

The report by the Science and Technology Committee, led by Tory MP Sarah Wollaston, lists various technical regulations it proposes for effective education about the importance of respecting the animals’ lives, arguing that their stock “remains in low numbers and too many are being killed.”

Lobsters are especially “vulnerable” due to the low population, the study claims.

Related Image Expand / Contract The British parliament Committee issued its report Thursday. (Courtesy: Cate Press Ltd.)

Most commercial lobster harvested in Britain has a minimum minimum age of 6 months to 14 years, the report found.

While the price varies according to the size of lobster and condition, many lobster are sold at different prices depending on when they are harvested.

“Lobsters are very sensitive to temperature and becoming too cold will kill them,” the report notes.

In fact, the lobsters made famous in the 2008 film “Finding Nemo” are actually lobster killed by boiling after killing their young by too close contact.

The committee said the mercury difference between boiling and heat is minimal and encouraged consumers to buy and cook carefully, the Mail on Sunday reported.

The report recommended that chefs and shoppers be more aware of the animals’ welfare and sell boiled lobsters and crabs that haven’t been harmed or harmed in any way.

“Diners should have a clear understanding of what to expect from any dish where lobster is involved,” the report suggested.

Cate Press Ltd., who produces the report, said they contacted 22 major supermarkets and chefs and “everybody told us they do their very best to observe this strict animal welfare legislation.

“But, at the same time, in a hunt for the best price, some of them might sometimes grab one to season a starter, or cook a lobster on the bone in a pie without using any animal-welfare risk assessments,” they said in a statement.

Britain has strict regulations on raw fish because of the risk to human health if blood from a fish is inadvertently eaten. Also, some restaurants, poultry farms and fish fingers are not permitted to use human blood.

However, Britain’s regulatory agency has faced criticism in the past for its rules on the disposal of livers, organs and bones, from animals including lobsters and crabs.

The rules have sometimes led to an abuse of the law. One recent incident involved nine football players who ate two lobster tails at a charity event in 2014. The meat was killed by plastic trays placed in boiling water to kill the shells, but no body parts were consumed.

Many see the law as needing improvement. Britain’s Food Standards Agency recommends a minimum three-year age for adult crabs, although there has been talk of introducing age limits.

A lobster can live up to six years, according to culinary experts. Crab could live for up to 25 years.

According to the report, the lobster industry has halved in size in recent years, with Britain’s leisure markets of restaurants and food stores being the biggest part of the trade.

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