I Complained To Trudeau About My Lost Car But He Has Not Responded

Photo On Oct. 31, 2018, my son logged into his Twitter account and the “follow page” was updated with his own tweets. They were not collated by anyone but him, and there was a…

I Complained To Trudeau About My Lost Car But He Has Not Responded

Photo

On Oct. 31, 2018, my son logged into his Twitter account and the “follow page” was updated with his own tweets. They were not collated by anyone but him, and there was a new Twitter handle he added: @trashimbrittany, referring to a travel date.

This was different. I realized my car was stolen, and I instantly reached out to the Toronto Police Service. The call came in at 6:17 p.m. to call back at 6:31. More than 30 minutes later, I was told that it was a petty theft and the matter was left with me. When I called back, there was no response. I then asked for a representative.

Three messages on the same night went unanswered. I was given an empty folder with a limited number of tags that the police department stores on seized cars. I sent another tweet pleading for help. After a while, the police returned my phone, but I got busy with other things and did not pay attention to the situation. So I assumed that was the end of it.

I began to think about my car more, and the fact that, for the last year, my father had been working with our authorities in Toronto and Mississauga, Ont., investigating how stolen cars that have run out of gas are shipped to countries all over the world. The problem has been many years in the making. The policeman who was covering his tracks at the Toronto Police Service had alerted his superiors that he knew of a police department in the Middle East that keeps brand new cars that run out of gas and ship them across the world. They have been doing this since I got my car in 2015.

I posted on Twitter to say I was in contact with the police. The following day, the police contacted me and said they were tracking my car. In Halifax, the handover took place. I was taken by bus and put on a plane for Amsterdam.

I was given a black American-style Chevrolet Silverado and given a car code and PIN to unlock it on the first day, then asked for new drivers licenses, and given a new escort at the airport and to the hotel for my first night.

I handed my keys over to the Canadian government in Halifax, but they are holding the vehicle. They have not given me back my car, my passport, or my information from my bank account. This has become a case of bank robbery and state-sponsored kidnappings. The Canadians have acted like criminals, a victim, and I filed a complaint with them. They have refused to respond to my personal account.

I expected Canada to consider me a victim. But they have turned a blind eye to me and no one from the Canadian government has paid attention to my complaint. They even said that I would not get help from the Public Prosecution Service of Canada because I have a Canadian passport. There is no justification for this. I have not done anything wrong.

I submitted a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about my case. He is still silent. I hope the Canadian prime minister will become part of the family.

I was told by the police officers that this was a case of “Global Seduction”. “Every single stolen car that has run out of gas is shipped to a new country,” they said.

The car in my possession is just part of a whole story of financial fraud. I was told that Canadians are not responsible for their monetary losses. I hope Mr. Trudeau will address my case.

Kevin Donovan is a spokesperson for the Canadian Charity Organized, Inc., Montreal

The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of The New York Times.

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